Hypermobility Syndrome Hip Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    can hypermobility go undiagnosed for years?
    I have bad knees and ankles and the physio asked if I have hypermobility. Would I know if I had this?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes.

      Hypermobility should not be confused with clinical instability.Hypermobility versus clinical instability: With hypermobility, ligamentous laxity can produce tight, achy muscles and may lead to early onset of arthritis. Clinical Instability, on the other hand, can be a serious, even life-threatening condition. It usually results from significant trauma or from certain diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (not the degenerative type of arthritis) . In clinical instability, the excessive motion of the vertebrae can cause pressure on nerves and the spinal cord leading to serious neurological problems. Hypermobility is not clinical instability. Furthermore, a person with a hypermobile spine does not usually go on to develop clinical instability.

      SUMMARY: If you often crack or pop your neck yourself, it probably means that the joints are hypermobile. The ligaments are a bit lax so the joints move a little more than they should. In response, the muscles tighten up to stabilize the joints. This makes your neck feel tight and makes you want to crack it. When you do that, the muscles are momentarily stretched, they relax somewhat, and you feel better for a while. But when you crack your neck you also stretch the loose ligaments further which makes the muscles tighten up again. It’s a vicious cycle.

      You might the site below helpful :

      http://www.spinegroup.com/Advice/NkCrk.h.

      The joint hypermobility syndrome is a condition that features joints that easily move beyond the normal range expected for a particular joint. The joint hypermobility syndrome is considered a benign condition. It is estimated that 10%-15% of normal children have hypermobile joints, or joints that can move beyond the normal range of motion. There is a tendency of the condition to run in families (familial). It is felt that certain genes are inherited that predispose to the development of hypermobile joints. Genes that are responsible for the production of collagen, an important protein that helps to glue tissues together, are suspected of playing a ro

      Because the joints are capable of excessive motion in people with the joint hypermobility syndrome, they are susceptible to injury. Symptoms of the joint hypermobility syndrome include pains in the knees, fingers, hips, and elbows. There is a higher incidence of dislocation and sprains of involved joints. Scoliosis (curvature of the spine) occurs more frequently in people with hypermobile joints. Joint hypermobility tends to decrease with aging as we become naturally less flexible.

      Signs of the syndrome are the ability to place the palms of the hands on the floor with the knees fully extended, hyperextension of the knee or elbow beyond 10 degrees, and the ability to touch the thumb to the forearm

      Often joint hypermobility causes no symptoms and requires no treatment. Many individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome improve in adulthood. Treatments are customized for each individual based on their particular manifestations. Joint pains can be relieved by medications for pain or inflammation. Proper physical fitness exercise can strengthen muscles and stability, but the nature of the exercise should be designed to avoid injury to joints

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know about the condition Marfan Syndrome?
    2 specialists at the hospital both said to me that they suspect I may have Marfan Syndrome, but they said there are no tests that can be done - I've done my research so I know what the features are of the condition, and I do seem to have quite a lot of these, but having planted this idea in my head, no one is willing to follow it through - do I need to get my heart checked?
    Does anyone out there actually have the condition themselves, who can offer me any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      I hope you find out what you need to know about Marfans.

      I just wanted to point out that anyone with flexible fingers that was worried by yakkydoc's answer they mustn't. If you are very flexible you might (only might) have Hypermobility Syndrome, which is a condition related to Marfans in type, but not as serious. I know this as I have it and it causes pain in my hips and/or knees at times, but it isn't a very serious condition, just painful at times. If you were worried at all see this link: http://www.hypermobility.org/whatishms.php which I hope will make things clear.

      lazlouz2001 - sorry to have used your question to correct someone's answer, but I was concerned about how incorrect yakkydoc's answer was.

      I hope you find out all you need to know about your condition - and I would suggest strongly that you go back to your doctors and INSIST that they clarify the situation, they have no right to leave you wondering and worrying. Good luck.

  3. QUESTION:
    Do my symptoms relate with hypermobility?
    I am 15 years old. I have been sick for two years. I miss a lot of school with medical permission. Lupus runs in family, and rheum. thought I might have it. I have not been tested by any bloodwork except my elevated sed. rate. I was just diagnosed with hyper mobility syndrome and patellofemoral syndrome (chondromalacia patella).

    My symptoms include, ofcourse, pain in joints and bones...length of arm, leg, feet, toes, hands, fingers, wrist, elbow, shoulders, everything except hips.

    I have gastritis and erosion, but biopsies show nothing.

    I am immune to most medicines, unknown cause.

    My symptoms of illness include: fevers, frequent illness, headaches and migraines, crushing pain in chest, pain in chest, pain in ribcages with trouble moving and breathing, scoliosis, shocks in spine with make my legs collapse and I fall, shooting pains in stomach and chest to brain, fatigue, always sleeping, rashes, in sun get rashes on chest and neck. And more personal/serious ones.
    Oh, I also get frequent sore throats, nose bleeds (in 2006, 1-2 per day)=anemia, nasal sores, and vomitting.

    I am going back to school in a week. I was prescribed physical therapy and an anti inflamatory. I want to make sure my medicine will work (Meloxin or something?), beacuse I missed too much school on medical excuses, and I can't do it this year. I want to know if I got the right diagnosis ? And if you have these symptoms too with HMS?

    • ANSWER:
      hmmm...you sure do have a lot of conditions..
      I think rather than physical therapy, which will only address soft tissue issues, chiropractor rehab may be more beneficial for you. Especially if you can find a chiropractic neurologist. They are hard to find...but I think even regular chiropractic care can be more of benefit...

hypermobility syndrome hip pain

Snapping Hip Syndrome Surgery

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the next step for hip pain relief in a 14 year old girl?
    My daughter is 14 and very active through dance. She has had hip pain for 18 months and when it first started we went to the doctors and then were referred to physio in a local children's hospital and she was told she had Snapping Hip Syndrome. She had physio every two weeks for several months but nothing worked and she was eventually discharged. Almost 6 months later she still has the pain in her right hip and now walks with a limp. She is very passionate about dance and quitting is a last resort to her. We returned to the doctors once again and he had never even heard of Snapping Hip Syndrome but he referred to the same physio anyway where she has had courses of stretching and exercising, ultrasounds and acupuncture. She is just finished her first session of acupuncture and is in more pain than usual. Just as a backup plan, how long would it be before surgery is an option? What other courses are there before surgery is even considered?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry for your daughter's pain and for the limitations in her favorite activity, and I know as a parent how hard it is to watch your child suffer this way.

      Most snapping hip syndrome patients respond well to physio and activity modification, but some do not, and athletes (including dancers of course) with this condition who do not respond to conservative care such as physio are faced with either surgical correction of the iliopsoas tendon or quitting the problem activity which is presumed to be a strongly contributing source of the pain. If she quit dancing and continued with physio exercise, there's a good chance the pain would end, but if she then resumed dancing, it could well return.

      Since she does not want to quit dancing and has tried and failed conservative (nonoperative) care for six months, she is at the point now where in the states she would be referred to an orthopedic surgeon specializing in hip or lower extremity care for consideration for surgery. Please click this link to see some evidence for treatment outcomes for snapping hip syndrome:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12130417
      It is important to find a surgeon who is very experienced in performing this procedure. Normally it is done by arthroscope in a minimally invasive outpatient surgical procedure. But please keep in mind that not every snapping hip syndrome patient is a suitable candidate for surgery for this condition. Outcome variation can depend in part on hip structure which should be assessed prior to undertaking surgery. Please click this link for more information about this:
      http://www.hss.edu/newsroom_study-identifies-patients-no-surgery-snapping-hip-tendon.asp

      Presuming she is a UK citizen and therefore must deal with NHS--and I mean no criticism with that observation, as there are pro and con tradeoffs comparing NHS to our fractured health care system in the states--I realize your options may be limited, but you should press for it. NHS care guidelines may vary from US standards.

  2. QUESTION:
    How do I cure a snapping hip?
    I know i have snapping hip syndrome and it hurts really bad. Is there any way to cure this quickly without getting surgery, or an injection?
    I am a gymnast and i already saw a physical therapist but the excercises she gave me are'nt really helping that much. My "snapping hip" hurts sooo bad, i'm afraid its gouing to effect my gymnastics.

    • ANSWER:
      when someone talks about pain in their hips I think about the tendons that attach the thigh to the body. It comes in by the pelvis and attaches to the pelvic bones. When that tendon shortens up, as tendons will do, it can pull the hip into the body and half short I am not sure about, but it is the only thing that I know about for that area. Here is how to release that tendon:
      Pelvic tendon
      With only shorts on lay on a bed and pull your legs up and bend them at the knee so your feet are flat on the bed. Take your hand and run it down the crease between your thigh and body. When you reach the area of your pelvis you will feel a bump in that crease. That is the tendon to work on. Take it between your fingers and thumb and press and hold a good amount of pressure on it. Then relax, take a deep breath and exhale and don’t tense up any part of your body. After 30 seconds slowly lower your leg outward until it has gone as far as it will. Then release the pressure but rest your leg there for one minute longer. As a side note, if you cannot get a grip on the tendon, press on it near the pelvis with as much pressure as you can. Don’t let it slip out from under that pressure. Then continue with the rest of the exercise.
      Be in something that allows you to get to the skin so you can find the tendon easier.

  3. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of snapping hip syndrome?
    I'm a runner and have had this for about a year. It doesn't hurt at all and the only time I feel it is when I put my hand on my hip as I walk. I was just wondering how to make it go away. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Usually, simple reassurance that nothing serious is wrong is sufficient. A sort course of anti-inflammatory medications, or possibly a cortisone injection will help control inflammation if this is contributing to the problem. Physical therapy may be useful for stretching out the muscles and tendons that cause a snapping hip and may help prevent the problem.
      Surgery is rarely necessary, and reserved for patients who have severe symptoms for long periods of time with adequate trial of non-operative treatments. If this is the case, surgery to relax the tendons, or remove the cartilage tear may help with the symptoms of a snapping hip.

snapping hip syndrome surgery

Snapping Hip Syndrome Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for Snapping hip syndrome?
    I think i have snapping hip syndrome, and my hip really hurts when it clicks, What will be the treatment for this? Im only in my late teens so will this worsen? My hip hurts when it is just rested as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Where do you feel the pain in your hip, over the hip point (trochanter head), the groin or the back of the hip (gluteal)?

      Do you walk with a normal gait, toe in or toe out, have trouble squatting or other specific symptoms?

      Teenagers often have muscle pains from rapid growth that may not take place evenly on both sides of the body. This is no excuse to ignore your condition.

      Avoid making your hip snap to prove you have a problem. Walk as straight as you can, exercise daily but avoid causing snapping or pain. Use ice packs on your pain area 20 minutes at a time, several times a day for relief, and use nothing except some tylenol, if your parents permit.

      Have your family doctor take a look if it does not go away in a few days, since there could be some more important causes such as inflammation or slipping of a bone growth center.

  2. QUESTION:
    What treatment helps a painful hip other than physio?
    I am a 14 year old girl and at at healthy weight. For 18 months I've had a very painful hip which turns out to be snapping hip syndrome (also known as a dancers hip). I tried physio in the first few months of pain but in didn't work so I quit. My doctor has now referred me to physio again but I'm not convinced it will work. Does anybody know what treatment there is for pains in my right hip, I also walk with a limp because otherwise I can feel it slipping in and out. Pain relief like paracetamol doesn't work but putting heat to it does for a little while. It also makes a loud snapping noise randomly and is stiff when I wake up. Does anyone have any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      acupuncture

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acupuncture

  3. QUESTION:
    Are there any special stretches/exercises that can reduce the pain from Snapping Hip Syndrome?
    I have self diagnosed myself with snapping hip syndrome, I have hip pain when I extend my leg from a bent position and when I lift my leg at an angle of 45 degrees or more off of the ground. This is a big problem for me as i am a competitive dancer who is at the studio 5+ times a week.
    * The pain I experience is a sharp popping sensation it is also audible. It sounds like a cracking/popping noise (kind of like someone cracking their toes but deeper in sound).

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible (orthopedic surgeon), for consultation. Both active and passive stretching exercises that include hip and knee extension should be the focus of the program. Stretching the hip into extension and limiting excessive knee flexion avoids placing the rectus femoris in a position of passive insufficiency, thereby maximizing the stretch to the iliopsoas tendon. Strengthening exercises for the hip flexors may also be an appropriate component of the program. Education, a non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug regimen, as well as activity modification or activity progression (or both) may be used. Once symptoms have decreased a maintenance program of stretching and strengthening can be initiated. Light aerobic activity (warm up) followed by stretching and strengthening of the proper hamstring, hip flexors, and iliotibial band length is important for reducing recurrences.
      Conservative measures generally resolve the problem in 6 to 8 weeks.

      See a doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

snapping hip syndrome treatment

Snapping Hip Syndrome Symptoms Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Are there any special stretches/exercises that can reduce the pain from Snapping Hip Syndrome?
    I have self diagnosed myself with snapping hip syndrome, I have hip pain when I extend my leg from a bent position and when I lift my leg at an angle of 45 degrees or more off of the ground. This is a big problem for me as i am a competitive dancer who is at the studio 5+ times a week.
    * The pain I experience is a sharp popping sensation it is also audible. It sounds like a cracking/popping noise (kind of like someone cracking their toes but deeper in sound).

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible (orthopedic surgeon), for consultation. Both active and passive stretching exercises that include hip and knee extension should be the focus of the program. Stretching the hip into extension and limiting excessive knee flexion avoids placing the rectus femoris in a position of passive insufficiency, thereby maximizing the stretch to the iliopsoas tendon. Strengthening exercises for the hip flexors may also be an appropriate component of the program. Education, a non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug regimen, as well as activity modification or activity progression (or both) may be used. Once symptoms have decreased a maintenance program of stretching and strengthening can be initiated. Light aerobic activity (warm up) followed by stretching and strengthening of the proper hamstring, hip flexors, and iliotibial band length is important for reducing recurrences.
      Conservative measures generally resolve the problem in 6 to 8 weeks.

      See a doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for Snapping hip syndrome?
    I think i have snapping hip syndrome, and my hip really hurts when it clicks, What will be the treatment for this? Im only in my late teens so will this worsen? My hip hurts when it is just rested as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Where do you feel the pain in your hip, over the hip point (trochanter head), the groin or the back of the hip (gluteal)?

      Do you walk with a normal gait, toe in or toe out, have trouble squatting or other specific symptoms?

      Teenagers often have muscle pains from rapid growth that may not take place evenly on both sides of the body. This is no excuse to ignore your condition.

      Avoid making your hip snap to prove you have a problem. Walk as straight as you can, exercise daily but avoid causing snapping or pain. Use ice packs on your pain area 20 minutes at a time, several times a day for relief, and use nothing except some tylenol, if your parents permit.

      Have your family doctor take a look if it does not go away in a few days, since there could be some more important causes such as inflammation or slipping of a bone growth center.

  3. QUESTION:
    What dose it mean when my hip pops when i walk?
    It started about a week ago, it started to pop when i walk and it hurts to lift it or move that much, the pain stopped for one day then came back, i havent been doing anything different could it be from soccer, what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have snapping hip syndrome...

      What is snapping hip syndrome?
      Snapping hip syndrome is a condition that is characterized by a snapping sensation, and often an audible 'popping' noise, when the hip is flexed and extended. There are several causes for snapping hip syndrome, most commonly due to tendons catching on bony prominences and "snapping" when the hip is moved.

      What causes snapping hip syndrome?
      There are three primary causes for snapping hip syndrome:
      •Iliotibial Band Snap
      The iliotibial band is a thick, wide tendon over the outside of the hip joint. The most common cause of snapping hip syndrome is when the Iliotibial band (or "IT band") snaps over the greater trochanter (the bony prominence over the outside of the hip joint). If this is the cause of snapping hip syndrome, patients may develop trochanteric bursitis from the irritation of the bursa in this region.

      •Iliopsoas Tendon Snap
      The iliopsoas tendon is the primary hip flexor muscle, and the tendon of this muscle passes just in front of the hip joint. The iliopsoas tendon can catch on a bony prominence of the pelvis and cause a snap when the hip is flexed. Usually when the iliopsoas tendon is the cause of snapping hip syndrome, patients have no problems, but may find the snapping annoying.

      •Hip Labral Tear
      The least common cause of snapping hip syndrome is a tear of the cartilage within the hip joint. If there is a loose flap of cartilage catching within the joint, this may cause a snapping sensation when the hip is moved. This cause of snapping hip syndrome typically causes a snapping sensation, but rarely an audible "pop." This cause of snapping hip syndrome may also cause an unsteady feeling, and patients may grab for support when the hip snaps.

      Are any tests necessary to diagnose snapping hip syndrome?
      An X-Ray is usually taken to confirm that there is no bony problem around the hip joint, but X-Rays are almost always normal with snapping hip syndrome. If the cause of snapping hip syndrome is thought to be due to a tear of the cartilage within the hip joint, an MRI may be obtained to look for evidence of this difficult to diagnose problem.
      Are any tests necessary to diagnose snapping hip syndrome?
      An X-Ray is usually taken to confirm that there is no bony problem around the hip joint, but X-Rays are almost always normal with snapping hip syndrome. If the cause of snapping hip syndrome is thought to be due to a tear of the cartilage within the hip joint, an MRI may be obtained to look for evidence of this difficult to diagnose problem.

      Is any treatment needed for snapping hip syndrome?
      Usually, simple reassurance that nothing serious is wrong is sufficient. A sort course of anti-inflammatory medications, or possibly a cortisone injection will help control inflammation if this is contributing to the problem. Physical therapy may be useful for stretching out the muscles and tendons that cause a snapping hip and may help prevent the problem.

      Surgery is rarely necessary, and reserved for patients who have severe symptoms for long periods of time with adequate trial of non-operative treatments. If this is the case, surgery to relax the tendons, or remove the cartilage tear may help with the symptoms of a snapping hip.

snapping hip syndrome symptoms pain

Psoas Snapping Hip Syndrome Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Clicking hip problem?
    Hi all,

    Whenever I take a step my hip clicks/clunks/whatever. Its not painful at the moment but I am worried it may cause trouble in the future. As of lately I have been doing leg exercises and hip stretches etc. to hopefully perhaps strengthen the muscle there, will it stop my hip from clicking? I see a chiropractor regularly and he cracks my hips and back but even after these sessions my hip still cracks. What can I do to stop it?

    Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      This is the injury that has plagued Joan Benoit Samuelson, the famous track star. Snapping Hip Syndrome is a clinical entity that causes pain and snapping in the hip joint. There are several known causes, the most common being the iliotibial band snapping over the greater trochanter (at the top of your thigh bone). It can also be caused by snapping of the iliopsoas tendon over the iliopectineal line (in general the pubic area of the hip bone), the iliofemoral ligaments over the femoral head (where the thigh bone connects to the hip bone), as well as other places on the hip bone.

      The gluteal muscles can also make a snapping sound as they go over the greater trochanter. The psoas tendon can also cause snapping hip as it passes over the hip joint, producing pain with hip flexion. The question to ask is why is this happening? The psoas tendon is in the front of the hip joint, the gluteal muscles are over the hip joint, and the iliotibial band (tensor fascia lata) is on the side of the hip joint, yet all of these structures are considered part of the problem? We don't think so.

      Hip joint ligament weakness causes excessive movement of the hip joint and thus the greater trochanter, since they are connected. This excessive movement of the greater trochanter would then encroach on the iliotibial band or gluteal muscles, causing a snapping sound. If the hip joint laxity caused the hip to move forward it would encroach on the psoas muscle, causing hip snapping with movement of this muscle (hip flexion). It is easier to explain Snapping Hip Syndrome as one hip problem versus three separate muscle problems. This also explains the dramatic results seen with treating Snapping Hip Syndrome with Prolotherapy.

      In my opinion, Prolotherapy is the treatment of choice for Snapping Hip Syndrome because it gets at the root cause of the problem, which is hip ligament laxity. Prolotherapy to the posterior hip capsule and ischiofemoral ligaments generally resolves the problem if the condition involves snapping of the iliotibial band or gluteal muscles, because posterior hip laxity is involved in these conditions.

      In psoas-muscle-related Snapping Hip Syndrome, the hip joint is moving anteriorly, encroaching on the muscle. Prolotherapy to the anterior hip ligaments, namely the iliofemoral ligament (Y ligament of Bigelow), will tighten the joint and stop the anterior protrusion of the hip.

      Prolotherapy is extremely effective at permanently resolving Snapping Hip Syndrome because it repairs the underlying etiology of the problem, hip ligament laxity.

psoas snapping hip syndrome treatment

Frozen Hip Socket

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for hip displasure in labrador retrievers?
    It is really hurting my dog.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there. Hip dysplasia isn't really curable per se. It is manageable. Unfortunately some bad breeders out there aren't breeding selectively in order to breed out or decrease incidences of hip dysplasia. This is particularly important for those breeds such as gorgeous labs who are particularly prone. They should hip screen all of their breeding stock. Anyway that aside, usually the way to manage it is to make sure the dog is warm - hip dysplasia is painful because the ball and socket of the hips wear away and cause severe arthritis - like us, once the cartilege is gone that makes joint movement smooth, the joints will rub and become painful. The reason dogs are prone to this is sometimes because their hip sockets aren't as deep as they could be - so they wear out faster. Make sure your dog's bed is well padded and warm - it's freezing out there are the moment so a heated bed may be beneficial. Sometimes massage and physiotherapy is indicated - you can also learn to massage your dog yourself. An extremely important part of HD management is maintaining your dog's weight at normal levels - not allowing it to become obese/overweight. This is particularly relevant to labs as they do tend to put on weight easily. Glucosamine and condroitin tablets are also administered daily. Labs are garbage gutses so they should eat the tablet if you just chuck it into their food. Sometimes hydrotherapy is useful as it is lower impact than walking on the pavements, but this is not something that is going to be easily accessible to most. Anti-inflammatory agents can be used but these cannot be human anti inflammatories and must be prescribed by the vet. Anti inflammatory drugs can really mess with stomach lining and intestines and aren't for amateurs to mess around with. There are some injections for it - anti inflammatory and I think a steroid as well but I won't comment on these as I don't know too much about them and i am not a vet surgeon. I looked up this website and found the information to be quite useful. http://www.offa.org/hiptreat.html

      The other thing - how old is your lab? If it is elderly (10 years plus), there really isn't going to be too much they can do - it's pretty much just management. If the dog is young, there may be more agressive courses of action including surgery but older dogs do not tend to come through surgery as well.

      This is something you should definitely talk to your vet about. The vet can assist you in making a decision by ensuring you are fully informed. Sometimes you can try out different treatments and see if they work before making a decision regarding your dog. If he's in pain constantly your vet can prescribe pain killers, but please refrain from administering him things like asprin, even though ppl on the site talk about it alot - you don't know if it's safe for your particular doggy.

  2. QUESTION:
    Wedding poses?
    I am photographing a friend's wedding tomorrow and am having a brain freeze on what poses I should do. She really likes more casual posing and their wedding is going to be outside in her parents' backyard. Their yard is lined with woods and they have a brick patio (where the actual ceremony will be held) and they also have a small water fountain and a lot of beautiful landscaping and flowers. Any suggestions would be helpful as well as any websites to take a look at. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      What time of day is the wedding? If it's later in the afternoon then the lighting will be better than high noon or early afternoon.

      Are you film or digital? Film has more latitude. With digital, you risk "blowing the highlights", or having no detail in the bright areas. (Like a white dress, for instance.) If you are not comfortable with manual settings, use the program mode and adjust the exposure comp until there are no winky-blinkys. Take a test shot or two, then check the histogram. You want pretty even distribution of the light levels. If they are all bunched to the left, it's too dark. If they are spilling off to the right, you have blown highlights. Adjust exposure as necessary.

      Best case scenario, you will have medium bright overcast. Perfect for portraits. Worse case, bright sun and spots of shade. They will probably have an arch or something set up where the actual vows will take place. If it is in sunlight, use your flash at high output and the fastest shutter speed which will synch. That fill flash will open up the shadows underneath eye sockets and noses, and equalize the light between subject and background. It will also eat batteries, so have some spares on hand.

      For your portraits, try to use a wide aperture, or use the portrait mode on your camera. Find nice, open shade if possible. Dappled sunlight is not your friend! So either have all shade or all sun, not some of each. Don't turn your subjects into the sun, (unless the sun is low in the sky) it will make them squint. Turn them at an angle to the sun, with the sun from the side or behind, if it's not too low. Use your flash, again, to open the shadows.

      Open shade is nice, too. In shade, you can try some with no flash, and some with flash set at minus compensation, start at minus half and try a few down to -1 or maybe -1.5.

      When posing, turn their bodies at an angle to the camera. Your subjects should always have a front and back shoulder, not a right and left. If it bends, bend it. Don't let the guys line up like prisoners with their hands in front of their crotch! (My pet peeve!) When doing groups, try to work in odd pairings. The b&g are always placed together, usually in front or a bit higher than the rest of the group. Hands in pocket for the guys are find. The girls, bride as well, will tend to hold their flowers too high. Have them lower the bouquet to waist level, or even to their side at hip level. Make sure the stems point to the back.

      Pay attention to your composition. Make your shots either full-length, 3/4, or close-up. Don't cut off feet or fingers. Watch for trees or poles etc etc growing out of people's heads. Use caution in the use of wide angle in the closeup portraits. Portraits are better using moderate telephoto, say about 80mm to 150.. Don't forget to leave a little room for cropping to an 8x10.

      Visit some professional wedding photographer's websites to see what poses you might try to duplicate. It's a bit late to practice much posing, but you can get some ideas. Make cheat sheets if you need to. Google Marc Williams, Bambi Cantrell, Jeff Ascough for starters.

      I hope all goes well tomorrow and your friendship survives the event. Wedding photography really isn't for the faint hearted or amateur photographers. Make sure the bride's expectations are in line with your skill level to avoid dissapointment. Best wishes and good luck!

  3. QUESTION:
    Something better than rawhide bones?
    Hello my dog eats rawhide bones in one sitting and was wondering if anyone thought pigs ears would be better for her. I am worried that eventually she might get an obstruction if you have any advice please! thank-you
    thank-you everyone!!

    • ANSWER:
      We get my dog real bones. You can get them at Pet Smart. They are usually cow bones. You can boil them in broth or fill them with peanut butter or frozen broth for an extra treat.

      My lab has had a femur bone and a hip socket bone that she loves. She has chewed threw most of the hip bone, but it has been almost a year. Her femur is still going strong, she loves both of them.

      The real bones are better for them because they are naturally carnivores. They take longer to chew threw and won't cause obstructions.

      I do give my lab a raw hide every once in a while, but the bones are better for her.

frozen hip socket

Hurler Syndrome Hip Dysplasia

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    which kinds of arthritis are there?
    there are rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis... which other ones are there? and what are its conditions ?

    • ANSWER:
      Achilles tendinitis

      Achondroplasia

      Acromegalic arthropathy

      Adhesive capsulitis

      Adult onset Still's disease

      Ankylosing spondylitis

      Anserine bursitis

      Avascular necrosis

      Behcet's syndrome

      Bicipital tendinitis

      Blount's disease

      Brucellar spondylitis

      Bursitis

      Calcaneal bursitis

      Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)

      Crystal deposition disease

      Caplan's syndrome

      Carpal tunnel syndrome

      Chondrocalcinosis

      Chondromalacia patellae

      Chronic synovitis

      Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

      Churg-Strauss syndrome

      Cogan's syndrome

      Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis

      Costosternal syndrome

      CREST syndrome

      Cryoglobulinemia

      Degenerative joint disease

      Dermatomyositis

      Diabetic finger sclerosis

      Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH)

      Discitis

      Discoid lupus erythematosus

      Drug-induced lupus

      Duchenne's muscular dystrophy

      Dupuytren's contracture

      Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

      Enteropathic arthritis

      Epicondylitis

      Erosive inflammatory osteoarthritis

      Exercise-induced compartment syndrome

      Fabry's disease

      Familial Mediterranean fever

      Farber's lipogranulomatosis

      Felty's syndrome

      Fibromyalgia

      Fifth's disease

      Flat feet

      Foreign body synovitis

      Freiberg's disease

      Fungal arthritis

      Gaucher's disease

      Giant cell arteritis

      Gonococcal arthritis

      Goodpasture's syndrome

      Gout

      Granulomatous arteritis

      Hemarthrosis

      Hemochromatosis

      Henoch-Schonlein purpura

      Hepatitis B surface antigen disease

      Hip dysplasia

      Hurler syndrome

      Hypermobility syndrome

      Hypersensitivity vasculitis

      Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

      Immune complex disease

      Impingement syndrome

      Jaccoud's arthropathy

      Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis

      Juvenile dermatomyositis

      Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

      Kawasaki disease

      Kienbock's disease

      Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

      Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

      Linear scleroderma

      Lipoid dermatoarthritis

      Lofgren's syndrome

      Lyme disease

      Malignant synovioma

      Marfan's syndrome

      Medial plica syndrome

      Metastatic carcinomatous arthritis

      Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD)

      Mixed cryoglobulinemia

      Mucopolysaccharidosis

      Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis

      Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

      Mycoplasmal arthritis

      Myofascial pain syndrome

      Neonatal lupus

      Neuropathic arthropathy

      Nodular panniculitis

      Ochronosis

      Olecranon bursitis

      Osgood-Schlatter's disease

      Osteoarthritis

      Osteochondromatosis

      Osteogenesis imperfecta

      Osteomalacia

      Osteomyelitis

      Osteonecrosis

      Osteoporosis

      Overlap syndrome

      Pachydermoperiostosis Paget's disease of bone

      Palindromic rheumatism

      Patellofemoral pain syndrome

      Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome

      Pigmented villonodular synovitis

      Piriformis syndrome

      Plantar fasciitis

      Polyarteritis nodos

      Polymyalgia rheumatica

      Polymyositis

      Popliteal cysts

      Posterior tibial tendinitis

      Pott's disease

      Prepatellar bursitis

      Prosthetic joint infectio

      Pseudoxanthoma elasticum

      Psoriatic arthritis

      Raynaud's phenomenon

      Reactive arthritis/Reiter's syndrome

      Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

      Relapsing polychondritis

      Retrocalcaneal bursitis

      Rheumatic fever

      Rheumatoid arthritis

      Rheumatoid vasculitis

      Rotator cuff tendinitis

      Sacroiliitis

      Salmonella osteomyelitis

      Sarcoidosis

      Saturnine gout

      Scheuermann's osteochondritis

      Scleroderma

      Septic arthritis

      Seronegative arthritis

      Shigella arthritis

      Shoulder-hand syndrome

      Sickle cell arthropathy

      Sjogren's syndrome

      Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

      Spinal stenosis

      Spondylolysis

      Staphylococcus arthritis

      Stickler syndrome

      Subacute cutaneous lupus

      Sweet's syndrome

      Sydenham's chorea

      Syphilitic arthritis

      Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

      Takayasu's arteritis

      Tarsal tunnel syndrome

      Tennis elbow

      Tietse's syndrome

      Transient osteoporosis

      Traumatic arthritis

      Trochanteric bursitis

      Tuberculosis arthritis

      Arthritis of Ulcerative colitis

      Undifferentiated connective tissue syndrome (UCTS)

      Urticarial vasculitis

      Viral arthritis

      Wegener's granulomatosis

      Whipple's disease

      Wilson's disease

      Yersinial arthritis

  2. QUESTION:
    How many genetic disorers can you list? List them.?

    • ANSWER:
      Achromatopsia
      Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita
      Adrenoleukodystrophy
      Aicardi Syndrome
      Albinism/Hypopigmentation
      Alexander Disease
      Alpers' Disease
      Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency
      Alzheimer's Disease
      Amblyopia
      Angelman Syndrome
      Anencephaly
      Aniridia
      Anophthalmia
      Ataxia Telangiectasia
      Autism
      Bardet-Biedl Syndrome
      Barth Syndrome
      Batten Disease
      Best's Disease
      Bipolar Disorder
      Bloom Syndrome
      Branchio-Oto-Renal (BOR) Syndrome
      Canavan Syndrome
      Cancer Genetics
      Carnitine Deficiencies
      Carnitine Acylcarnitine Translocase Deficiency
      Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Deficiency
      Cerebral Palsy

      Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

      Cleft Lip/Cleft Palate

      Coffin Lowry Syndrome

      Coloboma

      Color Blindness

      Congenital Heart Defects

      Congenital Hip Dysplasia (Dislocation)

      Connective Tissue Disorders

      Cooley's Anemia

      Corneal Dystrophy

      Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

      Cystic Fibrosis

      Cystinosis

      Diabetes

      Down Syndrome

      Duane Syndrome

      Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

      Epidermolysis Bullosa

      Familial Dysautonomia

      Familial Mediterranean Fever

      Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

      Fragile X Syndrome

      G6PD (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) Deficiency Anemia

      Galactosemia

      Gaucher Disease

      Gilbert's Syndrome

      Glaucoma

      Hemochromatosis

      Hemoglobin C Disease

      Hemophilia/Bleeding Disorders

      Hirschsprung's Disease

      Homocystinuria

      Huntington's Disease

      Hurler Syndrome

      Juvenile Retinoschisis (X Linked)

      Klinefelter Syndrome

      Leber Congenital Amaurosis

      Lipid Storage Diseases

      Long Q-T Syndrome

      Macular Degeneration

      Marfan Syndrome

      Marshall Syndrome

      McCune-Albright Syndrome

      Menkes Disease

      Metabolic Disorders

      Microphthalmus

      Mitochondrial Disease

      Mucolipidoses

      Mucopolysaccharide Disorders

      Muscular Dystrophy

      Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease

      Neural Tube Defects

      Neurofibromatosis

      Niemann-Pick Disease

      Noonan Syndrome

      Optic Atrophy

      Osteogenesis Imperfecta

      Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

      Phenylketonuria (PKU)

      Polycystic Kidney Disease

      Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum

      Progeria

      Ptosis

      Rentinitis Pigmentosa

      Scheie Syndrome

      Schizophrenia

      Sickle Cell Anemia

      Smith-Magenis Syndrome

      Skeletal Dysplasias

      Spherocytosis

      Spina Bifida

      Spinocerebellar Ataxia

      Stargardt Disease (Macular Degeneration)

      Stickler Syndrome

      Tay-Sachs Disease

      Thalassemia

      Treacher Collins Syndrome

      Tuberous Sclerosis

      Turner's Syndrome

      Urea Cycle Disorder

      Usher's Syndrome

      Velocardiofacial Syndrome

      von Hippel-Lindau Disease

      Werner Syndrome

      Williams Syndrome

      Xeroderma Pigmentosum

      XXX Syndrome

      XYY Syndrome

hurler syndrome hip dysplasia

Itb Syndrome Hip Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Whats the best stretches and workouts for Iliotibial Band Syndrome?
    I used to be in the National Guard and would like to go back, but I have had some problems with my IT band. I want it to be strong enough that when I go through BCT again I don't have problems with it. I would like to know whats the best stretches and workouts for it? Also anyone suggest and vitamins and supplements to help me out for BCT?

    • ANSWER:
      Immediate Treatment
      Firstly, be sure to remove the cause of the problem. Whether is be an overload problem, or a biomechanical problem, make sure steps are taken to remove the cause.

      The basic treatment for knee pain that results from ITB Syndrome is no different to most other soft tissue injuries. Immediately following the onset of any knee pain, the R.I.C.E.R. regime should be applied. This involves Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation, and Referral to an appropriate professional for an accurate diagnosis. It is critical that the R.I.C.E.R. regime be implemented for at least the first 48 to 72 hours. Doing this will give you the best possible chance of a complete and full recovery.

      Ongoing Treatment and Prevention
      Although the pain may be felt mainly in the knee, the problem is actually caused by the muscles that support the knee. Namely the tensor fasciae latae and the large muscle at the rear of your upper leg, called the gluteus maximus.

      Other muscles in the lower back, hip, backside and upper leg also affect the function of the knee, so it's important to pay attention to all these muscles. After the first 48 to 72 hours, consider a good deep tissue massage. It may be just what you need to help loosen up those tight muscles.

      Firstly, don't forget a thorough and correct warm up will help to prepare the muscles and tendons for any activity to come. Without a proper warm up the muscles and tendons will be tight and stiff. There will be limited blood flow to the leg muscles, which will result in a lack of oxygen and nutrients for those muscles.

      Before any activity be sure to thoroughly warm up all the muscles and tendons that will be used during your sport or activity. Click here for a detailed explanation of how, why and when to perform your warm up.

      ITB StretchSecondly, flexible muscles are extremely important in the prevention of most leg injuries. When muscles and tendons are flexible and supple, they are able to move and perform without being over stretched. If however, your muscles and tendons are tight and stiff, it is quite easy for those muscles and tendons to be pushed beyond their natural range of movement. To keep your muscles and tendons flexible and supple, it is important to undertake a structured stretching routine.

      The stretch to the right is one of the best stretches for the tensor fasciae latae.

      Stand upright and cross one foot behind the other. Then lean towards the foot that is behind the other. Hold this stretch for about 15 to 20 seconds, and then repeat it 3 to 4 times on each leg.

      Stretching is one of the most under-utilized techniques for improving athletic performance and getting rid of those annoying sports injuries. Don't make the mistake of thinking that something as simple as stretching won't be effective.

      Learn more about The Stretching Handbook & DVDAnd to help you improve your flexibility quickly and safely, you can't go past The Stretching Handbook & DVD. Together they include over 130 clear photographs and 40 videos of every possible stretching exercise, for every major muscle group in your body.

      The Stretching Handbook & DVD will show you, step-by-step, how to perform each stretch EXACTLY! Plus, you'll learn the benefits of flexibility; the 7 critical rules for safe stretching; and how to stretch properly. Discover more about The Stretching Handbook & DVD here.

      And thirdly, strengthening and conditioning the muscles around your knee and upper leg will help greatly to reduce the chance of knee injury and knee pain.

      If you are in too much pain to resume normal exercise, consider swimming, deep water exercise, or maybe cycling. Otherwise, The Walking Site has a list of safe, simple and easy strengthening exercises for the muscles of the upper leg and knee. To keep your knees in tip-top condition practice these regularly.

      If you enjoyed this issue of The Stretching & Sports Injury Report, please feel free to forward it to others, make it available for download from your site or post it on forums for others to read. Please make sure the following paragraph and URL are included.

      -----------------------------------------------------------
      Article by Brad Walker. Brad is a leading stretching and
      sports injury consultant with nearly 20 years experience
      in the health and fitness industry. For more articles on
      stretching, flexibility and sports injury, please visit
      The Stretching Institute.

  2. QUESTION:
    What can I expect in Physical Therapy?
    I need PT for IT band friction syndrome in my hip. This is my first time needing PT so what can I expect?

    • ANSWER:
      You should expect someone who asks many questions about your current problem, conducts a thorough evaluation and provides treatment consisting of modalities to reduce pain / inflammation, hands-on care and probably a home exercise program. As a PT and someone who has had ITB syndrome, I DISAGREE with the last post regarding pain response. Your treatments should not cause pain.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to help a knee sore from cross country?
    Today was my first day of summer cross country training and it was tiring! We ran round a lake (with many broken tile pieces, rocks, roots ect..) and i think I did something to my knee around there. I though I would try walking it off a bit but its been hurting all day. Do you any tips on how to help my knee now and help prevent future injury's? Thanks in advance :)

    • ANSWER:
      Running on uneven surfaces is really hard on the knees and I highly recommend that you stop it. The most common knee pains for runners are: Runner's Knee (caused by abrasion of the patella) and Illiotibial Band Syndrome [I'm suffering through this right now]. ITBS just sux. It's caused by damaging the the band of connective tissue that sits on top of your outer quad and runs from the hip to your knee, connecting in two places around the knee cap. This injury is characterized by a pain below the knee cap, but in NORMALLY noticed first on the outside of the knee where the ITB connects. There's not really a cure for this other than getting familiar with foam roller, ice, and starting a strengthening and stretching regime. Head over to Runner's World and check the injury forums for support groups and detailed information. Good Luck.

itb syndrome hip pain

Down Syndrome Hip Dysplasia

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the best breed of dog for a special needs family.?
    I have a 9 year old with asperger's syndrome and hdd. We also live in a flat with no garden, but have loads of parks in the area. Walking is no problem.
    We would like one who can be hugged but also like it's own time.
    Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I would seriously suggest a Golden Retriever. It is one of the most forgiving breeds I've ever worked with and could put up with a great deal as well as being perfectly capable of being on its' own.
      If you consider this breed be sure to find one whose breeder has tested her stock for hip dysplasia and hypothyroidism, two very common conditions found in Goldens. Both parents should be tested thyroid "normal" not just low and the hips should be excellent, not just good.
      Here is the standard and also a place to find breeders;
      http://www.akc.org. click on breed up above and then pull down until you find Golden Retriever. On that page you will see a picture and at the bottom click on breed standard.

  2. QUESTION:
    Why do my pomeranian dog is limping by his hind legs?
    It's 8 years old and is not taking food. He is able to keep his legs down. Please help.
    I'll definitely take him to the vet, please suggest any home remedies.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common problem in Pomeranians is luxating patella. Also Legg-Calvé-Perthes syndrome and hip dysplasia can occur, but are rare. Eating and sore leg may be abit of both if not better in 24hrs best check with a vet and lots of cuddles and a warm hot water bottle

  3. QUESTION:
    How old does a Great Dane have to be to breed?

    i have been thinking of getting a great dane and someone said that if they are not going to be bred they should be fixed and i want to know how long i have to decide that
    but i think i might want to breed
    personal? what do you mean?
    why would i do that?

    • ANSWER:
      Many of us wait until they are 3. Some problems don't show up until they are older. Plus they should be fully matured by 3. Some lines are slower then others. Gives you plenty of time to show your dane and proof them to be worthy of being bred. Then all of the health tests before breeding.

      This is my general reply to folks that want to learn more about breeding.

      So you are interested in breeding your great danes. That's wonderful!
      First you need learn how to go about this the "right" way.

      You are probably new to this whole thing. Many folks were in your
      shoes many years ago. Trust me, many of us had to be taught the same
      way you are. Thankfully, there are people out there who will take the
      time to show you how to go down the right road. Please do your
      research and make the right decision. Don't be kennel blind!

      I am sure you have beautiful Great Dane(s)! But have you thought
      about all of the issues involved in raising a healthy litter, such as
      the pedigree, health tests, conformation, and faults?

      Do you know the health history on each of your dog's pedigrees? Have
      you studied the pedigree back 5-6 generations? Do you know if any of
      them had wobblers or heart conditions? We have many serious health
      problems in this breed. Just because a Dane passes a heart exam
      doesn't mean it's not carrying one of the deadly heart problems that
      can be passed on to their puppies. Puppies can die between 8 weeks
      and 2+ years old.

      Only the very best Danes should ever be bred. The only reason anyone
      should breed his or her Dane is to try to improve the breed.

      Has your dog/btch been evaluated in the show ring by qualified
      judges against top competition? Have breeder-judges evaluated them if
      they haven't shown? Can you honestly say your stud dog is better or
      equal to the stud dogs on these pages

      http://greatdanereview.com/html/stud_gallery.html
      http://www.thegreatdanegallery.com/studs.html
      http://www.daneworld.com/DW-DP-StudDogs.htm

      Will the stud dog's conformation compliment hers? Or will you be doubling up on
      bad conformation faults. Too many faults can lead to very unhealthy
      danes when they get older. 2+ years you can see them start to
      break down in front of your eyes. They can also develop temperament
      problems when they are not healthy.

      Have they been OFA certified clear of hip and elbow dysplasia?

      Has a veterinary ophthalmologist certified them clear of PRA,
      checked their eyes and other hereditary eye defects?

      Have they been tested clear of brucellosis?

      Do they both have the proper temperament?

      Does the dog/btch have a least 4 titled dogs in his/her 3-year
      generation pedigree?

      Are you ready and qualified to handle a stud dog or btch in season?

      Breeding doesn't always happen 1-2-3. Do you have the necessary
      facilities to board a btch in season, or an intact male?

      Are you prepared for whelping cost and puppy care? Do you realize
      that it takes more than putting two dogs in an area together? Do
      you realize that leaving a dog and a btch in season alone together
      can be disastrous and may even physically harm both?

      Are you prepared to loose your btch during whelping or a c-section?
      I have known several that have died during whelping. You then would
      have to tube and bottle-feed the puppies around the clock. The
      puppies may start dying one by one because they didn't get the needed
      colostrum to survive and fight off diseases? Do you know anything
      about Fading Puppy Syndrome?

      Will you be responsible for the puppies and take one or two back a
      year when the new owners no longer want them anymore?

      These are some things that I have told others that are interested in
      breeding quality dogs.

      Help at a local Great Dane Rescue. Believe me, you will learn a lot
      there. I did!

      Get involved with your local breed club. Find a (good) mentor. Or
      few. More the better! I have several

      Study the Great Dane Standard.

      Join Several Great Dane Email Lists to learn all you can.

      Know your genetics! Health & Color.
      Know Great Dane Pedigrees and not just the color you want to breed.

      Subscribe to Dane magazines. Study the pics and pedigrees.

      Consult an attorney (specializes in animal law) to write up a good
      legal Contract for your puppies. Pet and show quality.

      Learn about whelping a litter and your responsibilities.

      Buy a show quality Dane from a responsible breeder with a good
      Reputation. Show your puppy! Let your peers evaluate your dogs.

      Is Your Dog Breeding Quality?
      http://www.bouviers.net/shouldyoubreed/breed.pdf

      Issues to discuss before you breed your dog
      http://www.learntobreed.com/

      GREAT DANE STANDARD
      http://www.gdca.org/illustrated.htm

      Great Dane Health Foundation of America
      http://www.gdhfa.org/

      Great Dane Links: Great Dane & Canine Health
      http://www.ginnie.com/gdlinks4.htm

down syndrome hip dysplasia

Snapping Syndrome Hip Pain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Are there any special stretches/exercises that can reduce the pain from Snapping Hip Syndrome?
    I have self diagnosed myself with snapping hip syndrome, I have hip pain when I extend my leg from a bent position and when I lift my leg at an angle of 45 degrees or more off of the ground. This is a big problem for me as i am a competitive dancer who is at the studio 5+ times a week.
    * The pain I experience is a sharp popping sensation it is also audible. It sounds like a cracking/popping noise (kind of like someone cracking their toes but deeper in sound).

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible (orthopedic surgeon), for consultation. Both active and passive stretching exercises that include hip and knee extension should be the focus of the program. Stretching the hip into extension and limiting excessive knee flexion avoids placing the rectus femoris in a position of passive insufficiency, thereby maximizing the stretch to the iliopsoas tendon. Strengthening exercises for the hip flexors may also be an appropriate component of the program. Education, a non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug regimen, as well as activity modification or activity progression (or both) may be used. Once symptoms have decreased a maintenance program of stretching and strengthening can be initiated. Light aerobic activity (warm up) followed by stretching and strengthening of the proper hamstring, hip flexors, and iliotibial band length is important for reducing recurrences.
      Conservative measures generally resolve the problem in 6 to 8 weeks.

      See a doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the next step for hip pain relief in a 14 year old girl?
    My daughter is 14 and very active through dance. She has had hip pain for 18 months and when it first started we went to the doctors and then were referred to physio in a local children's hospital and she was told she had Snapping Hip Syndrome. She had physio every two weeks for several months but nothing worked and she was eventually discharged. Almost 6 months later she still has the pain in her right hip and now walks with a limp. She is very passionate about dance and quitting is a last resort to her. We returned to the doctors once again and he had never even heard of Snapping Hip Syndrome but he referred to the same physio anyway where she has had courses of stretching and exercising, ultrasounds and acupuncture. She is just finished her first session of acupuncture and is in more pain than usual. Just as a backup plan, how long would it be before surgery is an option? What other courses are there before surgery is even considered?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry for your daughter's pain and for the limitations in her favorite activity, and I know as a parent how hard it is to watch your child suffer this way.

      Most snapping hip syndrome patients respond well to physio and activity modification, but some do not, and athletes (including dancers of course) with this condition who do not respond to conservative care such as physio are faced with either surgical correction of the iliopsoas tendon or quitting the problem activity which is presumed to be a strongly contributing source of the pain. If she quit dancing and continued with physio exercise, there's a good chance the pain would end, but if she then resumed dancing, it could well return.

      Since she does not want to quit dancing and has tried and failed conservative (nonoperative) care for six months, she is at the point now where in the states she would be referred to an orthopedic surgeon specializing in hip or lower extremity care for consideration for surgery. Please click this link to see some evidence for treatment outcomes for snapping hip syndrome:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12130417
      It is important to find a surgeon who is very experienced in performing this procedure. Normally it is done by arthroscope in a minimally invasive outpatient surgical procedure. But please keep in mind that not every snapping hip syndrome patient is a suitable candidate for surgery for this condition. Outcome variation can depend in part on hip structure which should be assessed prior to undertaking surgery. Please click this link for more information about this:
      http://www.hss.edu/newsroom_study-identifies-patients-no-surgery-snapping-hip-tendon.asp

      Presuming she is a UK citizen and therefore must deal with NHS--and I mean no criticism with that observation, as there are pro and con tradeoffs comparing NHS to our fractured health care system in the states--I realize your options may be limited, but you should press for it. NHS care guidelines may vary from US standards.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for Snapping hip syndrome?
    I think i have snapping hip syndrome, and my hip really hurts when it clicks, What will be the treatment for this? Im only in my late teens so will this worsen? My hip hurts when it is just rested as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Where do you feel the pain in your hip, over the hip point (trochanter head), the groin or the back of the hip (gluteal)?

      Do you walk with a normal gait, toe in or toe out, have trouble squatting or other specific symptoms?

      Teenagers often have muscle pains from rapid growth that may not take place evenly on both sides of the body. This is no excuse to ignore your condition.

      Avoid making your hip snap to prove you have a problem. Walk as straight as you can, exercise daily but avoid causing snapping or pain. Use ice packs on your pain area 20 minutes at a time, several times a day for relief, and use nothing except some tylenol, if your parents permit.

      Have your family doctor take a look if it does not go away in a few days, since there could be some more important causes such as inflammation or slipping of a bone growth center.

snapping syndrome hip pain