Hip Impingement Syndrome Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do you make your back feel better without going to the doctors ?
    I have major back pains. Its off and on all the time. and I'm not old I'm under 20 years old so I don't even know what to do. Someone please help me ! I do not want to be in pain anymore.

    • ANSWER:
      You most likely have mechanical back syndrome, but the treatment is the same for Sciatica. In it's worst state, you will feel painful electrical charges in your foot as the nerve wraps around your pelvis and hip and back down the back of the leg through the buttocks.

      Anytime you feel numbness or tingling in an extremity it is VITAL that you get to a doctor as soon as you can to have it checked out. If there is an impingement that cuts off the circulation, you can lose the limb, so please get to a doctor.

      Please see your doctor for a muscle relaxant like flexerall only by prescription to stop your muscles from squeezing the nerve on your left side.

      You can use a combination of non prescribed medication to try and hit the areas that are most annoying; however, 50mg-150mg indomethicin oral or anal works the absolute best for your back.

      1. I used to use a combination of medications which included 400mg Ibuprofen 4x a day with food. This takes the swelling and inflammation down. DO NOT exceed1600mg in one day and you may need prilosec for stomach protection as ALL ANTI INFLAMMATORIES are difficult on the stomach. ***You can use Tylenol with Ibuprofen and Aspirin watch for daily maximums & don't exceed.

      2. Robaxacet is Tylenol (acetominophen) combined with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this also comes with codeine on request from the pharmacist. This only relaxes any tight muscles around the pain and helps reduce some pain. You can use Robaxacet with Ibuprofen and Aspirin, BUT NOT Tylenol as it's already an ingredient in this pill.

      3. Robaxacyl is Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) combines with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this has a blood thinning active ingredient and isn't ideal for anyone under age 16 years or complications with blood pressure, ailments, etc. This both takes down the inflammation as well as treats the pain.You can use Robaxacyl with Ibuprofen and Tylenol, BUT NOT Aspirin as it's already an ingredient in this pill.
      --------------------------------------…
      4. Aleve is a Nonsteroidal Anti Inflammatory (Naproxen) which will helps reduce the inflammation, and as the inflammation decreases so does the pain; BUT you CANNOT mix this drug with any of the above mentioned safely.

      5. Dynamint has been used on horses legs for years, but it does an amazing job on sore muscles. It's ingredients are Peppermint Oil, Eucalyptus Oil , Tea Tree Oil and Calendula Oil.

      6. Deep Cold Gold is an alternative rub that works very well on tight aching back & low back tendons.

      It's serious as you well know from the pain. You will need to treat it with ICE for 20 minutes on and off every 2.5 hours in your butt cheek and the heart of the pain. You can put a heating pad on your low back afterwards.

      You will need to see your doctor if this progressively gets worse. You can request Flexerill (muscle relaxant) to relaxe the muscles from contracting around the pinched nerve. You may also require pain medicaiton depending on the severity.

      I do not find much comfort with the chiropractor but it doesn't hurt to check in with yours for normal maintenance and his opinion on sciatica so you can decide what road you want to take.

      Physio, Kinesiology, and Yoga are the best for treatment. I usually hit the hot tub and steam room at the pool and stretch in the warm environment.

      Lie on your back and pull your knee to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Do it to the other side too and repeat.

      Grab both knees to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Bring to the center, and gently rock to the left side and the right side still holding on to your knees for approximately 10 times and repeat. This relieves a lot of the discomfort.

      You can also learn to stretch and touch your toes lying on the floor with you bum. Stetch to your shin and hold 20 secs, stretch to your ankle and hold 20 secs, stretch to your arch and hold for 20 secs, and eventually you'll be able to hold the bottom of your feet.

      I find these exercises not only alleviate my suffering, but it prevents the re-occurrence. I know because as long as I do them I never even have an episode, but it takes a long time to heal the memory of back pain.

      Exercise
      http://www.healthyexerciseworld.com/lowe…
      http://www.medicinenet.com/sciatica/arti…

  2. QUESTION:
    I have horrible back pain and I need remidies?
    My back has been in excruciating pain for two days and I can not even sit without crying pain. Please help I have tried straight back chairs, ibuprofen, and excercise. None help

    • ANSWER:
      You most likely have mechanical back syndrome, but the treatment is the same for Sciatica. In it's worst state, you will feel painful electrical charges in your foot as the nerve wraps around your pelvis and hip and back down the back of the leg through the buttocks.

      Anytime you feel numbness or tingling in an extremity it is VITAL that you get to a doctor as soon as you can to have it checked out. If there is an impingement that cuts off the circulation, you can lose the limb, so please get to a doctor.

      Please see your doctor for a muscle relaxant like flexerall only by prescription to stop your muscles from squeezing the nerve on your left side.

      You can use a combination of non prescribed medication to try and hit the areas that are most annoying; however, 50mg-150mg indomethicin oral or anal works the absolute best for your back.

      1. I used to use a combination of medications which included 400mg Ibuprofen 4x a day with food. This takes the swelling and inflammation down. DO NOT exceed1600mg in one day and you may need prilosec for stomach protection as ALL ANTI INFLAMMATORIES are difficult on the stomach. ***You can use Tylenol with Ibuprofen and Aspirin watch for daily maximums & don't exceed.

      2. Robaxacet is Tylenol (acetominophen) combined with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this also comes with codeine on request from the pharmacist. This only relaxes any tight muscles around the pain and helps reduce some pain. You can use Robaxacet with Ibuprofen and Aspirin, BUT NOT Tylenol as it's already an ingredient in this pill.

      3. Robaxacyl is Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) combines with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this has a blood thinning active ingredient and isn't ideal for anyone under age 16 years or complications with blood pressure, ailments, etc. This both takes down the inflammation as well as treats the pain.You can use Robaxacyl with Ibuprofen and Tylenol, BUT NOT Aspirin as it's already an ingredient in this pill.
      --------------------------------------…
      4. Aleve is a Nonsteroidal Anti Inflammatory (Naproxen) which will helps reduce the inflammation, and as the inflammation decreases so does the pain; BUT you CANNOT mix this drug with any of the above mentioned safely.

      5. Dynamint has been used on horses legs for years, but it does an amazing job on sore muscles. It's ingredients are Peppermint Oil, Eucalyptus Oil , Tea Tree Oil and Calendula Oil.

      6. Deep Cold Gold is an alternative rub that works very well on tight aching back & low back tendons.

      It's serious as you well know from the pain. You will need to treat it with ICE for 20 minutes on and off every 2.5 hours in your butt cheek and the heart of the pain. You can put a heating pad on your low back afterwards.

      You will need to see your doctor if this progressively gets worse. You can request Flexerill (muscle relaxant) to relaxe the muscles from contracting around the pinched nerve. You may also require pain medicaiton depending on the severity.

      I do not find much comfort with the chiropractor but it doesn't hurt to check in with yours for normal maintenance and his opinion on sciatica so you can decide what road you want to take.

      Physio, Kinesiology, and Yoga are the best for treatment. I usually hit the hot tub and steam room at the pool and stretch in the warm environment.

      Lie on your back and pull your knee to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Do it to the other side too and repeat.

      Grab both knees to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Bring to the center, and gently rock to the left side and the right side still holding on to your knees for approximately 10 times and repeat. This relieves a lot of the discomfort.

      You can also learn to stretch and touch your toes lying on the floor with you bum. Stetch to your shin and hold 20 secs, stretch to your ankle and hold 20 secs, stretch to your arch and hold for 20 secs, and eventually you'll be able to hold the bottom of your feet.

      I find these exercises not only alleviate my suffering, but it prevents the re-occurrence. I know because as long as I do them I never even have an episode, but it takes a long time to heal the memory of back pain.

      Exercise
      http://www.healthyexerciseworld.com/lowe…
      http://www.medicinenet.com/sciatica/arti…

  3. QUESTION:
    My glutes, pelvis, hip flexor, and back muscle on the right side hurt like shit, what should i do to heal?
    i run track and field but thats about it.

    • ANSWER:
      You most likely have mechanical back syndrome, but the treatment is the same for Sciatica. In it's worst state, you will feel painful electrical charges in your foot as the nerve wraps around your pelvis and hip and back down the back of the leg through the buttocks.

      Anytime you feel numbness or tingling in an extremity it is VITAL that you get to a doctor as soon as you can to have it checked out. If there is an impingement that cuts off the circulation, you can lose the limb, so please get to a doctor.

      Please see your doctor for a muscle relaxant like flexerall only by prescription to stop your muscles from squeezing the nerve on your left side.

      You can use a combination of non prescribed medication to try and hit the areas that are most annoying; however, 50mg-150mg indomethicin oral or anal works the absolute best for your back.

      1. I used to use a combination of medications which included 400mg Ibuprofen 4x a day with food. This takes the swelling and inflammation down. DO NOT exceed1600mg in one day and you may need prilosec for stomach protection as ALL ANTI INFLAMMATORIES are difficult on the stomach. ***You can use Tylenol with Ibuprofen and Aspirin watch for daily maximums & don't exceed.

      2. Robaxacet is Tylenol (acetominophen) combined with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this also comes with codeine on request from the pharmacist. This only relaxes any tight muscles around the pain and helps reduce some pain. You can use Robaxacet with Ibuprofen and Aspirin, BUT NOT Tylenol as it's already an ingredient in this pill.

      3. Robaxacyl is Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) combines with methocarbonal (muscle relaxant)...this has a blood thinning active ingredient and isn't ideal for anyone under age 16 years or complications with blood pressure, ailments, etc. This both takes down the inflammation as well as treats the pain.You can use Robaxacyl with Ibuprofen and Tylenol, BUT NOT Aspirin as it's already an ingredient in this pill.
      --------------------------------------…
      4. Aleve is a Nonsteroidal Anti Inflammatory (Naproxen) which will helps reduce the inflammation, and as the inflammation decreases so does the pain; BUT you CANNOT mix this drug with any of the above mentioned safely.

      5. Dynamint has been used on horses legs for years, but it does an amazing job on sore muscles. It's ingredients are Peppermint Oil, Eucalyptus Oil , Tea Tree Oil and Calendula Oil.

      6. Deep Cold Gold is an alternative rub that works very well on tight aching back & low back tendons.

      It's serious as you well know from the pain. You will need to treat it with ICE for 20 minutes on and off every 2.5 hours in your butt cheek and the heart of the pain. You can put a heating pad on your low back afterwards.

      You will need to see your doctor if this progressively gets worse. You can request Flexerill (muscle relaxant) to relaxe the muscles from contracting around the pinched nerve. You may also require pain medicaiton depending on the severity.

      I do not find much comfort with the chiropractor but it doesn't hurt to check in with yours for normal maintenance and his opinion on sciatica so you can decide what road you want to take.

      Physio, Kinesiology, and Yoga are the best for treatment. I usually hit the hot tub and steam room at the pool and stretch in the warm environment.

      Lie on your back and pull your knee to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Do it to the other side too and repeat.

      Grab both knees to your chest and hold for 20 secs. Bring to the center, and gently rock to the left side and the right side still holding on to your knees for approximately 10 times and repeat. This relieves a lot of the discomfort.

      You can also learn to stretch and touch your toes lying on the floor with you bum. Stetch to your shin and hold 20 secs, stretch to your ankle and hold 20 secs, stretch to your arch and hold for 20 secs, and eventually you'll be able to hold the bottom of your feet.

      I find these exercises not only alleviate my suffering, but it prevents the re-occurrence. I know because as long as I do them I never even have an episode, but it takes a long time to heal the memory of back pain.

      Exercise
      http://www.healthyexerciseworld.com/lowe…
      http://www.medicinenet.com/sciatica/arti…

hip impingement syndrome treatment

Snapping Hip Syndrome

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How does Snapping Hip Syndrome affect you during pregnancy?
    My girlfrends was diagnosed with Snapping Hip Syndrome as a child, and is now 8 months pregnant.
    Can it affect her during the later parts of pregnancy, or the actual labour process at all?

    • ANSWER:
      oh ouch! I had that during my last pregnancy. Honestly the worst part was trying to get in and out of beds,chairs, couch etc. The shifting around causes the cartilage to pop and it's excrutiating....very similar to how your neck suddenly pops if you turn it the wrong way. Felt like someone had punched me right "there". It doesn't actually cause any kind of complications for the pregnancy or delivery.It is actually caused by the hormone relaxin that is released during pregnancy. Your pelvis is actually two pieces joined in the front and back by cartilage. This cartilage becomes relaxed and this causes it to become "unstable". Not dangerous at all, just miserable. For what it's worth my daughter is now 5 months old and I have absolutely no symptoms from it any longer...took a few weeks after birth for it to stop being miserable but it did clear up.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for Snapping hip syndrome?
    I think i have snapping hip syndrome, and my hip really hurts when it clicks, What will be the treatment for this? Im only in my late teens so will this worsen? My hip hurts when it is just rested as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Where do you feel the pain in your hip, over the hip point (trochanter head), the groin or the back of the hip (gluteal)?

      Do you walk with a normal gait, toe in or toe out, have trouble squatting or other specific symptoms?

      Teenagers often have muscle pains from rapid growth that may not take place evenly on both sides of the body. This is no excuse to ignore your condition.

      Avoid making your hip snap to prove you have a problem. Walk as straight as you can, exercise daily but avoid causing snapping or pain. Use ice packs on your pain area 20 minutes at a time, several times a day for relief, and use nothing except some tylenol, if your parents permit.

      Have your family doctor take a look if it does not go away in a few days, since there could be some more important causes such as inflammation or slipping of a bone growth center.

  3. QUESTION:
    Are there any special stretches/exercises that can reduce the pain from Snapping Hip Syndrome?
    I have self diagnosed myself with snapping hip syndrome, I have hip pain when I extend my leg from a bent position and when I lift my leg at an angle of 45 degrees or more off of the ground. This is a big problem for me as i am a competitive dancer who is at the studio 5+ times a week.
    * The pain I experience is a sharp popping sensation it is also audible. It sounds like a cracking/popping noise (kind of like someone cracking their toes but deeper in sound).

    • ANSWER:
      See your health care provider as soon as possible (orthopedic surgeon), for consultation. Both active and passive stretching exercises that include hip and knee extension should be the focus of the program. Stretching the hip into extension and limiting excessive knee flexion avoids placing the rectus femoris in a position of passive insufficiency, thereby maximizing the stretch to the iliopsoas tendon. Strengthening exercises for the hip flexors may also be an appropriate component of the program. Education, a non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug regimen, as well as activity modification or activity progression (or both) may be used. Once symptoms have decreased a maintenance program of stretching and strengthening can be initiated. Light aerobic activity (warm up) followed by stretching and strengthening of the proper hamstring, hip flexors, and iliotibial band length is important for reducing recurrences.
      Conservative measures generally resolve the problem in 6 to 8 weeks.

      See a doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

      I hope this helps you. And good luck.

snapping hip syndrome

Treatment For Frozen Hip Joint

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What treatment is recommended for osteoarthritis in the knee?
    Im 33 yrs old and have been told I may have osteoarthritis in my knee. What treatments are reccommended for someone my age, I've been told to try to avoid cortisone injections if possible, not sure why! Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I was also told at age 33 that I had osteoarthritis in my knees. An arthroscopy revealed severe damage to the cartilage of the left knee due to a cheerleading injury in high school that had never been treated or repaired. I've tried many different things over the years -- ice packs, heat (worked better for me than cold), bio-freeze gel, capsaicin ointment, numerous over-the-counter and prescription meds (Celebrex and advil have worked the best for me), a knee brace, eliminating certain foods from my diet -- dairy, gluten, nightshade plants (none of which made any difference) and exercise. My doctor's advice was to keep my weight at a healthy level and stay physically active via walking, biking or swimming only. Most other forms of exercise have the potential to cause further damage. I finally had a knee replacement at the age of 49, which made a huge difference. My doctor recommended against cortisone injections, saying that in his experience, they temporarily relieved the pain but caused greater deterioration of the cartilage. Having had a cortisone injection in my hip by an earlier doctor, I saw the hip joint deteriorate rapidly afterwards (as viewed on x-rays taken 6 months apart). Everyone's body is different, so that what works for one person may not work for another. With arthritis, there's a certain amount of trial and error until you find the diet/exercise/medication regimen that works for you. Good luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    Why do I have a rotating pain in the back of my neck and shoulder?
    The pain subsides when I lay on my back without a pillow. However,sometimes throughout the day I have a pain that seems to be in the back of my shoulders/trapezius and the lower back of my neck. I can't take many anti-inflammatories due to an ulcer history. I have been icing it on and off and it seems to helping a bit. Is there any advice on what I should do aside from seeing a doctor? I have a job that requires driving a bit during the day.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Icing it on and off is great, for the first 48 hrs. You can then move on to heat. You can use heat for quite a few days. You mention that you can not take many anti-inflammatory pills. Have you ever tried an all natural anti-inflammatory, that uses systemic enzymes? Heal-n-Soothe is a truly amazing product.

      Now you mention that you drive a lot for your job. You just hit the nail on the head. So barring trauma, muscle imbalances are the most common reasons for back pain. Chances are, you have never heard of muscle imbalances and worse you don't even know that your own muscles are out of balance. But the reality is that everyone has muscle imbalances to some degree - regardless of age, sex, or level of fitness. No one is perfect. And even if you did manage to achieve perfection, you could not stay there for long.

      In simple terms, a muscle imbalance occurs when you have overdeveloped and tight muscles in one area of your body while the opposing muscles are weak and stretched out of their normal position. These imbalances can happen anywhere on the body and often develop as the result of the routine things you do while on the job, playing sports, or engaging in other activities you enjoy.

      Here are just a few conditions that can develop as a result of muscle imbalances: IT band syndrome, SI joint syndrome, sciatica, frozen shoulder, knee pain, hip pain, and all forms of back pain...As your muscles get more and more out of balance, you end up pulling your self out of proper alignment thus producing uneven more stress and causing additional wear and tear on muscles, ligaments, joints, and even the spine.Almost all of us live our lives with chronic unrecognized muscular imbalances and while it does take time for muscle imbalances to cause a symptomatic condition the first signs of trouble are evident on our bodies in the form of postural dysfunctions. Postural dysfunction can be seen in the abnormal position on the pelvis, head, neck, shoulder and even in the curvature of the spine.

      Once a postural dysfunction has developed, your body cannot go on for long this way before you will begin to experience problems. That is why you should never just cover up the pain or put off addressing your condition. In other words, if you are in your 40s, don't wait until you're 60's to decide you have a problem.Try this analogy: If you drive your car with the wheels out of alignment, the tread on your tires is going to wear unevenly. If you don't get an alignment, eventually you're going to have a blowout. The same principle holds true for your back and other areas of your body.

      Makes sense, doesn't it? Since my answer is long enough, you can find out about how you can perform specific, targeted stretches after you identify which imbalances you have by going to: http://www.losethebackpain.com/treatments/musclebalancetherapy.html

  3. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for hip displasure in labrador retrievers?
    It is really hurting my dog.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there. Hip dysplasia isn't really curable per se. It is manageable. Unfortunately some bad breeders out there aren't breeding selectively in order to breed out or decrease incidences of hip dysplasia. This is particularly important for those breeds such as gorgeous labs who are particularly prone. They should hip screen all of their breeding stock. Anyway that aside, usually the way to manage it is to make sure the dog is warm - hip dysplasia is painful because the ball and socket of the hips wear away and cause severe arthritis - like us, once the cartilege is gone that makes joint movement smooth, the joints will rub and become painful. The reason dogs are prone to this is sometimes because their hip sockets aren't as deep as they could be - so they wear out faster. Make sure your dog's bed is well padded and warm - it's freezing out there are the moment so a heated bed may be beneficial. Sometimes massage and physiotherapy is indicated - you can also learn to massage your dog yourself. An extremely important part of HD management is maintaining your dog's weight at normal levels - not allowing it to become obese/overweight. This is particularly relevant to labs as they do tend to put on weight easily. Glucosamine and condroitin tablets are also administered daily. Labs are garbage gutses so they should eat the tablet if you just chuck it into their food. Sometimes hydrotherapy is useful as it is lower impact than walking on the pavements, but this is not something that is going to be easily accessible to most. Anti-inflammatory agents can be used but these cannot be human anti inflammatories and must be prescribed by the vet. Anti inflammatory drugs can really mess with stomach lining and intestines and aren't for amateurs to mess around with. There are some injections for it - anti inflammatory and I think a steroid as well but I won't comment on these as I don't know too much about them and i am not a vet surgeon. I looked up this website and found the information to be quite useful. http://www.offa.org/hiptreat.html

      The other thing - how old is your lab? If it is elderly (10 years plus), there really isn't going to be too much they can do - it's pretty much just management. If the dog is young, there may be more agressive courses of action including surgery but older dogs do not tend to come through surgery as well.

      This is something you should definitely talk to your vet about. The vet can assist you in making a decision by ensuring you are fully informed. Sometimes you can try out different treatments and see if they work before making a decision regarding your dog. If he's in pain constantly your vet can prescribe pain killers, but please refrain from administering him things like asprin, even though ppl on the site talk about it alot - you don't know if it's safe for your particular doggy.

treatment for frozen hip joint

Frozen Knee Syndrome

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why do I have a rotating pain in the back of my neck and shoulder?
    The pain subsides when I lay on my back without a pillow. However,sometimes throughout the day I have a pain that seems to be in the back of my shoulders/trapezius and the lower back of my neck. I can't take many anti-inflammatories due to an ulcer history. I have been icing it on and off and it seems to helping a bit. Is there any advice on what I should do aside from seeing a doctor? I have a job that requires driving a bit during the day.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Icing it on and off is great, for the first 48 hrs. You can then move on to heat. You can use heat for quite a few days. You mention that you can not take many anti-inflammatory pills. Have you ever tried an all natural anti-inflammatory, that uses systemic enzymes? Heal-n-Soothe is a truly amazing product.

      Now you mention that you drive a lot for your job. You just hit the nail on the head. So barring trauma, muscle imbalances are the most common reasons for back pain. Chances are, you have never heard of muscle imbalances and worse you don't even know that your own muscles are out of balance. But the reality is that everyone has muscle imbalances to some degree - regardless of age, sex, or level of fitness. No one is perfect. And even if you did manage to achieve perfection, you could not stay there for long.

      In simple terms, a muscle imbalance occurs when you have overdeveloped and tight muscles in one area of your body while the opposing muscles are weak and stretched out of their normal position. These imbalances can happen anywhere on the body and often develop as the result of the routine things you do while on the job, playing sports, or engaging in other activities you enjoy.

      Here are just a few conditions that can develop as a result of muscle imbalances: IT band syndrome, SI joint syndrome, sciatica, frozen shoulder, knee pain, hip pain, and all forms of back pain...As your muscles get more and more out of balance, you end up pulling your self out of proper alignment thus producing uneven more stress and causing additional wear and tear on muscles, ligaments, joints, and even the spine.Almost all of us live our lives with chronic unrecognized muscular imbalances and while it does take time for muscle imbalances to cause a symptomatic condition the first signs of trouble are evident on our bodies in the form of postural dysfunctions. Postural dysfunction can be seen in the abnormal position on the pelvis, head, neck, shoulder and even in the curvature of the spine.

      Once a postural dysfunction has developed, your body cannot go on for long this way before you will begin to experience problems. That is why you should never just cover up the pain or put off addressing your condition. In other words, if you are in your 40s, don't wait until you're 60's to decide you have a problem.Try this analogy: If you drive your car with the wheels out of alignment, the tread on your tires is going to wear unevenly. If you don't get an alignment, eventually you're going to have a blowout. The same principle holds true for your back and other areas of your body.

      Makes sense, doesn't it? Since my answer is long enough, you can find out about how you can perform specific, targeted stretches after you identify which imbalances you have by going to: http://www.losethebackpain.com/treatments/musclebalancetherapy.html

  2. QUESTION:
    What are different types of skeletal diseases?
    I am doing a project for school, and for some reason I am not finding very accurate results. Anybody care to help?
    :)

    • ANSWER:
      People interested in this subject often clicked these ...
      AIDS
      Arthritis : Pictures
      Autoimmune Diseases
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      Bunions
      Bursitis
      Cancer
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      Cerebral Palsy
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      Cushings Disease
      Diabetes
      Down Syndrome
      Fibromyalgia
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      Fosamax & Osteonecrosis
      Frozen Shoulder
      Gout
      Hemangioma
      Herniated Disc
      Infectious Diseases
      Injuries & Wounds
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      Lupus
      Marfan Syndrome
      Multiple Myeloma
      Myasthenia
      Neurofibromatosis
      Osteoarthritis
      Osteoporosis
      Parkinsons Disease
      Plantar Fasciitis
      Rheumatoid Arthritis
      Sarcoidosis
      Sciatica
      Shin Splints
      Spondylitis
      Sports Injuries
      Tendonitis
      Tennis Elbow
      Wilsons Disease

      Human diseases are commonly manifested in the skeletal system. The skeleton may be the primary or secondary target of the disease and the disease may be congenital or acquired. While understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the bone has blossomed in the last several years, much remains to be understood about the underlying biology of the skeleton. The gaps in the understanding of skeletal biology are evident in the paucity of tissue-specific therapies for skeletal diseases.

      The objectives of this protocol are fourfold: 1) to allow us to receive bone specimens from investigators outside the NIH, 2) to provide a protocol within which patients with skeletal disease can be evaluated and treated here at NIH, 3) to provide a protocol under which trainees can evaluate patients with skeletal diseases and 4) to provide a pool of patients with skeletal diseases from which questions of basic pathogenetic mechanisms may serve as the basis for future studies.

      Within this study, bone formation will be assessed using cell and molecular biological approaches when specimens are sent from outside of NIH, and when recruited to NIH, patients will undergo clinically-indicated testing and possibly receive treatment which will be limited to approved medications

  3. QUESTION:
    Why do I still get lower back pain, is it normal?
    I had my son 4 months ago and I sometimes still get lower back pain after sitting for a while, then trying to get up. Is this normal? I would think that it should be gone by now. I hate back pain.

    • ANSWER:
      It is common in pregnancy to form muscle imbalances, due to the extra weight from the baby. Barring trauma, muscle imbalances are the second common cause for back pain. Chances are, you have never heard of muscle imbalances and worse you don't even know that your own muscles are out of balance. But the reality is that everyone has muscle imbalances to some degree - regardless of age, sex, or level of fitness. No one is perfect. And even if you did manage to achieve perfection, you could not stay there for long.

      In simple terms, a muscle imbalance occurs when you have overdeveloped and tight muscles in one area of your body while the opposing muscles are weak and stretched out of their normal position. These imbalances can happen anywhere on the body and often develop as the result of the routine things you do while on the job, playing sports, or engaging in other activities you enjoy.

      Here are just a few conditions that can develop as a result of muscle imbalances: IT band syndrome, SI joint syndrome, sciatica, frozen shoulder, knee pain, hip pain, and all forms of back pain.

      As your muscles get more and more out of balance, you end up pulling your self out of proper alignment thus producing uneven more stress and causing additional wear and tear on muscles, ligaments, joints, and even the spine.

      Almost all of us live our lives with chronic unrecognized muscular imbalances and while it does take time for muscle imbalances to cause a symptomatic condition the first signs of trouble are evident on our bodies in the form of "postural dysfunctions". Postural dysfunction can be seen in the abnormal position on the pelvis, head, neck, shoulder and even in the curvature of the spine.

      Once a postural dysfunction has developed, your body cannot go on for long this way before you will begin to experience problems. That is why you should never just cover up the pain or put off addressing your condition. In other words, if you are in your 40s, don't wait until you're 60's to decide you have a problem.

      To address your muscle imbalances you can can perform a self assessment. Once a postural dysfunction is found, the corrective exercises and stretches can be performed.

      To learn more, you can go to: http://www.losethebackpain.com/treatments/musclebalancetherapy.html

frozen knee syndrome

Internal Snapping Hip Syndrome Surgery

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    My hip is clicking, but it doesn't hurt, is it anything to worry about?
    been working out somewhat of late and my hip has started clicking when i walk up stairs or do squats, its progressively getting louder. Its not hurting, i was just wondering should i be worried, is it worth a trip to the doc?
    I'm 22, arthritus, really? Surely thats when you're older :o S eep!!

    • ANSWER:
      At 22, you shouldn't think it is arthritis, although In a rare case it may be. But I doubt it. There are three things that may also cause a snapping or clicking hip. All three of them may not cause pain.
      #1 - External Snapping Hip syndrome - this happens when your Iliotibial band becomes tight and snaps over the greater trochanter (a little bony prominence on the outside of your hip). If you lay on your side with the snapping hip side up and move your leg forward and then back and feel a click on the outside of your hip, this is likely the problem. Heat and stretching of the IT ban will fix this along with a course of NSAIDS
      #2 - Internal Snapping hip syndrome - is a snapping of the iliopsoas tendon over the iliopectineal eminence. This is deep and in the groin area. You will feel this when you go into a squat and stand up. This may increase the symptoms more or less if you internally or externally rotate your hip. Lie on your back bring your knee to your chest, extned your leg with you leg rotated out and then agian in. Feel for a click in your hip, if this is happens you likely have internal snapping hip. Treatment for this is, stretching of Illiopsoas. And NSAIDS
      #3 - Internal derangment - this is actually in the hip joint. Either a hip labral tear or a loose body in the joint. This is usually accompanied with some type of trauma. If this is the problem the only option is deal with it or surgery to remove it.

      With all of the above, they may not cause pain, however, they may soon.

  2. QUESTION:
    snapping hip syndrome...psoas release surgery good or bad idea?
    Sorry in advance. This one is a bit extensive. a lot of questions and issues. Thank you for your time.

    I am in the United States Navy and (unfortunately) we don't have the best medical care. I started having pain/snapping/grinding in my left hip August 2006. I thought it was muscle pain from overuse and didn't go to medical to get treated for it. Finally, in January 2007, I decided to go and get it checked out. They took x-rays and didn't find anything, so they gave me Motrin and sent me on my way. The pain continued and worsened so I went back to get it checked out June 2007. They took new x-rays and compared them to the x-rays from January and noticed a possible "calcium buildup" which they referred to as "callusing" on the interior part of the femur. Which they thought may have been a small fracture that the first x-rays didn't catch and over time had calcified. But, being on a ship, the doctors aren't really specially trained to read the x-rays so they put me on crutches and sent me to the local Naval hospital Balboa for a second opinion on the "lump". At Balboa, they told me that "the bump was not convincing enough." and completely ruled out that it was the source of the problem or that it was even an issue at all and took me off the crutches.

    I began physical therapy (but in the military, you don't get appointments right away. I waited weeks in between all of my appointments.) I attended 2 sessions and was then sent on a seven month deployment in November 2007. They were obviously somehow convinced that I could treat myself while away. Keep in mind that there are no physical therapist on board. I did the stretches and exercises that I could but had to deal with the lack of equipment available. So, I spent everyday guessing what I should be doing to fix my hip. Also, there is 8 flights of "stairs" (which are really more like ladders) from my berthing (living quarters) to my work space. So, you can only imagine how many stairs I was climbing on a daily basis. So, needless to say, it was not any better when I got back from deployment.

    We got back June 2008 and I made the soonest appointment with the major joint orthopedic specialist that I could get. It was a month wait. I seen him July 2008 and restarted physical therapy at the end of July. I was designated "not fit for shipboard duty" and have been put on shore duty (working in an office on shore not on a ship) until February 2009. It is now September and I just got reevaluated again and they said that my strength is increasing but my symptoms are not changing at all and would like to try surgery. They said that the cortisone shot was only a temporary pain relief. And would mask the pain rather that get rid of it completely.

    This is the information that I have found online:
    "Recurrence of snapping, weakness, and numbness were the most common complications of surgery for internal snapping hip, and some patients required further surgery"
    and
    "Most do not do well after this surgery."
    So, I have been rather discouraged to elect this surgery option.
    I can't find many positive statistics about this.
    And finally, the questions:
    1. Is there a website or does anyone know of statistics or success rates and helpful information of the psoas release surgery?
    2. Do I have any other options?
    3. I REALLY REALLY REALLY do NOT want Naval doctors operating on me. If I do elect the surgery, how can I go about finding and being operated on by a civilian doctor of my choice without having to pay out of my pocket and using my Tricare medical insurance from the Navy?
    4. If I elect not to do the surgery, can they kick me out and not give me benefits (G.I. bill etc.)?

    Any good information is helpful and greatly appreciated. Thank you for your input.
    There are actually three kinds of snapping hip...external (which is with the 'IT' band that you referred to) internal (psoas) and Intra-articular (labral tears and such). I have the internal one that the iliopsoas tendon 'snaps' across the femoral head or lesser trochanter.
    http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/2004/0104/meislin.htm

    I am not convinced that I should go the surgery route yet either since I have only been to 2 sessions of PT before deployment and 7 sessions after. Which is a total of 9 sessions. I thought that it would take longer to be able to strengthen as well.

    At Physical Therapy, I start with a 10 min warm up on the elliptical. Then, I stretch. And then I strengthen muscles. mainly, but not limited to, glutes. I also use therabands, steps, throwing ball at trampoline and catching while standing on left leg only, squats, therapy ball, leg lifts, small weights and also foam roller for IT band. then I ice it.
    Thank you for all your help! :)
    Oops...left out an important part...before deployment, I had an Arthrogram done where they ruled out labral tear.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there, sorry to hear you are having such problems, hip injuries are nasty and I do hope you feel better soon.
      The previous answer was not correct in saying the psoas cannot cause snapping hip. The iliopsoas tendon can snap over the iliopectineal eminence causing 'internal snapping hip' as opposed to the 'external snapping hip' of the IT band snapping over the greater trochanter.
      Another thing I think you should consider is that 'bump' you talk about. You should see an orthopaedic HIP specialist, not just a regular OS as they are more experienced with picking up things that regular OS aren't quite as knowledgable about yet, such as hip impingement and labral tears. They should be sending you for an MRI Arthrogram to rule out other issues. Your bump sounds as if it could be what is called a 'cam impingement' which can in turn cause a labral tear in the socket that causes a snapping sensation as well. The labrum is a fibrocartillage that surrounds the socket to add as a seal for the fluid in there and to provide depth to the socket. When it is torn, a flap of the tear can get 'caught' in the joint causing pain and snapping.
      I have this problem myself and had hip arthroscopy to debride my tear in June last year. However it now appears that the underlying cause, a possible impingement was not addressed so i am still having problems. Please take a look at my homepage as I have written my whole story there and kept a blog. There are a lot of support groups and other blogs that I have linked to as well.
      Good luck and I hope you feel better soon! If you want to do more research on this, just do a google search for Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip labral tear.

      Jess
      www.jessmcb.com

      Oops...after all that I just read about your arthrogram at the bottom lol...keep in mind though that these tests aren't always 100% accurate and if you continue to have symptoms a second opinion and/or test may be needed.

  3. QUESTION:
    Refuse surgery in the Navy?...?
    The doctors have began talking about surgery options with me for a psoas release for my snapping hip syndrome I have been diagnosed with.
    Most of the articles I have read all say about the same thing...

    Recurrence of snapping, weakness, and numbness were the most common complications of surgery for internal snapping hip, and some patients required further surgery.

    also,

    Most do not do well after this surgery

    I have discussed my concerns with my husband (who is also in the Navy) and decided that I do not want to undergo this procedure.

    Am I allowed to refuse the surgery?
    If I do, will I get discharged?
    (I don't mind being discharged, but I am not refusing it so I will get discharged either.)
    Will I still receive benefits after I get out (GI Bill, disability, medical)?
    What percentage of disability will I get (and amount of pay) if my hip pops and snaps out o place, although I can still walk, just not too fast or up stairs easily and running is out of the question as well...

    Thank you for all your help and time.

    • ANSWER:
      An administrative finding could determine that your refusal of surgery amounts to making your condition worse through your own willful neglect. In that case the Secretary of the Navy will have no choice but to discharge you as unfit for further service without compensable disability. Such a decision will also bar you from receiving any compensation from the VA. The source below is the section of Federal law which covers this situation.

internal snapping hip syndrome surgery

What Does Snapping Hip Syndrome Sound Like

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can you help me diagnose any of these injuries?
    I landed on my neck several weeks ago when my friends table top me. Now it is stiff and I have pain in a vertebrae when I try and move it straigt back. I alos have pain in my foot around my fifth metatarsal, but it only hurts after basketball or after running a lot. It is a sharp pain and feels like its bruised to the touch. That also has been hurting for a while. Lastly, I have snapping hip syndrome in the interior of my hip, around the groin area. It has hurt for weeks and stretching the tendon doesn;t seem to help and rest doesnt either. COuld it be a labral tear?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, this injury sounds like a labral tear...

  2. QUESTION:
    What exactly happens when you crack your knuckles?
    what makes the popping sound and what exactly is moving around in your fingers? Also what harm can it cause later on?

    • ANSWER:
      To produce the clicking sounds, many people bend their fingers into unusual positions. These positions are usually ones that their own muscles are unable to achieve, and which are not commonly experienced in everyday use. For example, bending a finger backwards away from the palm (into extension), pulling them away from the hand (distraction), compressing a finger knuckle toward the palm (into flexion), or twisting a finger about the first bone's axis (torsion).

      Cracking within the body may also be caused by a breaking bone.

      The snapping of tendons or scar tissue over a prominence (as in snapping hip syndrome) can also generate a loud snapping or popping sound.[2]

      [edit] Source of sound

      The physical mechanism is as yet unproven, but suggested theories include:

      1. Cavitation within the joint—small cavities of partial vacuum form in the fluid then rapidly collapse, producing a sharp sound. This explains the popping that can occur in any joint, such as during spinal manipulation. Synovial fluid cavitation is the most likely theory and substantial evidence exists in support of it. (Discussed in detail below.) [3]
      2. Rapid stretching of ligaments.
      3. Adhesions being broken, which simply means that as two cartilage surfaces are pressed together, they form adhesions, and when the joints are separated this makes the popping or cracking sound.

      Of these theories perhaps the most popular is cavitation. When a manipulation is performed, the applied force separates the articular surfaces of a fully encapsulated synovial joint, which in turn creates a reduction in pressure within the joint cavity. In this low pressure environment, some of the gases that are dissolved in the synovial fluid (which are naturally found in all bodily fluids) leave the solution creating a bubble or cavity, which rapidly collapses upon itself, resulting in a "clicking" sound. This process is known as cavitation. The contents of the resultant gas bubble are thought to be mainly carbon dioxide.[4] The effects of this process will remain for a period of time known as the "refractory period", which can range from a few minutes to some hours while it is slowly reabsorbed back into the synovial fluid. There is some evidence that ligament laxity may be associated with an increased tendency to cavitate.[5]

      [edit] Repercussions

      A single event is not enough to cause damage to the joint, although there is a hypothesis that prolonged joint stress due to cracking knuckles may eventually lead to a higher risk of joint damage. However, the long-term consequences of this practice have not been studied thoroughly, and the scientific evidence is inconclusive. The common parental advice "cracking your knuckles gives you arthritis" is not supported by any evidence, but habitual knuckle crackers are more likely to have hand swelling and lower grip strength.[6]

  3. QUESTION:
    Do I have tendinitis or something else?
    I am a ballet dancer and I have been having this popping sound from my left hip for a couple months, it happens when I lift my leg to the side mostly and especially when I do grande ronde jambes. When I asked, my teacher said it was either hip flexor tendinitis or snapping hip syndrome.

    • ANSWER:

what does snapping hip syndrome sound like

Hip Syndrome In Children

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How does Snapping Hip Syndrome affect you during pregnancy?
    My girlfrends was diagnosed with Snapping Hip Syndrome as a child, and is now 8 months pregnant.
    Can it affect her during the later parts of pregnancy, or the actual labour process at all?

    • ANSWER:
      oh ouch! I had that during my last pregnancy. Honestly the worst part was trying to get in and out of beds,chairs, couch etc. The shifting around causes the cartilage to pop and it's excrutiating....very similar to how your neck suddenly pops if you turn it the wrong way. Felt like someone had punched me right "there". It doesn't actually cause any kind of complications for the pregnancy or delivery.It is actually caused by the hormone relaxin that is released during pregnancy. Your pelvis is actually two pieces joined in the front and back by cartilage. This cartilage becomes relaxed and this causes it to become "unstable". Not dangerous at all, just miserable. For what it's worth my daughter is now 5 months old and I have absolutely no symptoms from it any longer...took a few weeks after birth for it to stop being miserable but it did clear up.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the next step for hip pain relief in a 14 year old girl?
    My daughter is 14 and very active through dance. She has had hip pain for 18 months and when it first started we went to the doctors and then were referred to physio in a local children's hospital and she was told she had Snapping Hip Syndrome. She had physio every two weeks for several months but nothing worked and she was eventually discharged. Almost 6 months later she still has the pain in her right hip and now walks with a limp. She is very passionate about dance and quitting is a last resort to her. We returned to the doctors once again and he had never even heard of Snapping Hip Syndrome but he referred to the same physio anyway where she has had courses of stretching and exercising, ultrasounds and acupuncture. She is just finished her first session of acupuncture and is in more pain than usual. Just as a backup plan, how long would it be before surgery is an option? What other courses are there before surgery is even considered?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry for your daughter's pain and for the limitations in her favorite activity, and I know as a parent how hard it is to watch your child suffer this way.

      Most snapping hip syndrome patients respond well to physio and activity modification, but some do not, and athletes (including dancers of course) with this condition who do not respond to conservative care such as physio are faced with either surgical correction of the iliopsoas tendon or quitting the problem activity which is presumed to be a strongly contributing source of the pain. If she quit dancing and continued with physio exercise, there's a good chance the pain would end, but if she then resumed dancing, it could well return.

      Since she does not want to quit dancing and has tried and failed conservative (nonoperative) care for six months, she is at the point now where in the states she would be referred to an orthopedic surgeon specializing in hip or lower extremity care for consideration for surgery. Please click this link to see some evidence for treatment outcomes for snapping hip syndrome:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12130417
      It is important to find a surgeon who is very experienced in performing this procedure. Normally it is done by arthroscope in a minimally invasive outpatient surgical procedure. But please keep in mind that not every snapping hip syndrome patient is a suitable candidate for surgery for this condition. Outcome variation can depend in part on hip structure which should be assessed prior to undertaking surgery. Please click this link for more information about this:
      http://www.hss.edu/newsroom_study-identifies-patients-no-surgery-snapping-hip-tendon.asp

      Presuming she is a UK citizen and therefore must deal with NHS--and I mean no criticism with that observation, as there are pro and con tradeoffs comparing NHS to our fractured health care system in the states--I realize your options may be limited, but you should press for it. NHS care guidelines may vary from US standards.

  3. QUESTION:
    Why is a young Down Syndrome boy acting out sexually?
    Whenever I change a six year old Down's boy, he grinds his hips suggestively, hits his penis, masturbates and has a lacivious look on his face. He also thinks the whole thing is very funny. I know it is very attention seeking, but at his age, could it be signs of sexual abuse?

    • ANSWER:
      Its hard for me to imagine a 6 year old child having sexual feelings he is too young for that, maybe at age 11 or 12. Still it is very awkward behavior. Sexual abuse might be the cause or maybe he has watched adult videos. Maybe the parents watched adult videos together with him there thinking he wouldn't get it because he is too young and has Down Syndrome so they saw no harm. Or maybe he saw his parents having sex.

hip syndrome in children